Mashable Marketing Director Takes on Social Media

By iCopy Blogger, Senior Social Media Analyst and Movie-Meltdown Expert, Alex Dalenberg

A couple weeks ago, Todd Wasserman, marketing editor for Mashable, posted this share-worthy takedown of social media marketing – Let’s Face it: Most Social Media Marketing is a Waste of Time.

Read the whole thing. It’s worth your time, especially if you’re tired of the usual social media evangelism that floods your B2B Twitter stream.

Basically, the point Wasserman makes is that the importance of social media is way overblown for marketers and needs its own Jerry Maguire moment. You know, when Tom Cruise gets mad at his seedy sports agency and decides he isn’t going to take it anymore.

And Wasserman’s not the only one pointing this out. A study from IBM, which he cites, shows that Twitter generated zero sales referrals on Black Friday.

My personal favorite piece of social media analysis gleaned from Black Friday: most people were tweeting about long lines. Now that’s some serious brand insight.

Among Wasserman’s more salient points were a few that I heartily agree with:

  • You can’t buy “likes” anymore.
  • The level of engagement from your followers is much more important than your raw number.
  • And your social media efforts mean absolutely nothing if you’re not offering a quality product.

Take it from us: We write and edit the heck out of everything iCopywriter clients assign – but there probably isn’t a case where sterling grammar saved a bad business model.

But there is one point Wasserman makes that I think is up for debate. You’re not a publisher, you’re an advertiser, he says.

I’m not so sure. In the literal sense, yes, you are promoting products and services with your content. But from a nuts-and-bolts perspective of what it takes to do that online, you face the same challenges that print and online publishers do everyday:

  • How to create clean, compelling content that reflects well on your business.
  • How to keep that content updated on a regular basis.
  • And, most importantly, how to find the people who can make that happen.

How much time, energy and money you invest in social media and other forms of content depends on how you measure ROI. That’s going to be different for every firm. You might say the right response to social media is also from Jerry Maguire: “Show me the money.”

But from our perspective, businesses are cranking out more text than ever before. Like everything else your business does, it needs to be quality.

[Editor's note: I resisted the urge for a shameless self-plug in that last line...well, almost...]

 

 

FreakyFriday: Weird of the Day – Black Friday Gets Freaky

By: iCopywriter blogger Alex Dalenberg

Is there a freakier Friday than Black Friday? This blogger is tucking into the leftover sweet potatoes and apple pie and skipping out on the Super Bowl of shopping. So far, it’s looking more and more like I made a good decision.

ABC News has a good rundown of the chaos thus far. Some of the lowlights:

  • 71-year-old man arrested in a Walmart parking lot in Covington, Wash., for vehicular assault. He ran over two people with his SUV.
  • In San Antonio, a shopper pulled a gun on a man who cut in line outside a Sears.
  • Five men assaulted and robbed a 14-year-old boy outside of a Bed Bath and Beyond early this morning in Baltimore.
  • And, in Massachusetts, a man scored a big-screen TV, but left his two-year-old son at a Kmart.

Also, the Los Angeles Times reports that there was a small earthquake in New Jersey, but thankfully no injuries.

Of course, the funny part is that Black Friday may not even offer best deals of the year outside of a few limited doorbusters that the big-box stores use as loss leaders. Fox Business reports that, at least in 2011, Black Friday was actually one of the worst days of the year for a snagging good deal. And Decide.com, a Seattle-based price tracking website that also attempts to predict whether an item will go up or down in price, says that the best deals of the holiday season are actually yet to come.

As consumers are armed with more and more information, it’s worth asking how long traditions like Black Friday can hold up. Sure, there’s a certain sport to Black Friday that has its own unique appeal, but for today I’m perfectly content typing away here at home over some cold turkey.

But as an alternative, I’d like to suggest events like Small Business Saturday as well as other local shopping events being promoted by smaller retailers and businesses. It’s a good way to keep a few dollars in the community and find some great new stores outside the usual mega-retailers.

And, of course, a belated Happy Thanksgiving from the team here at iCopywriter. Whether you’re a Black Friday warrior or spent the day sleeping in, have a happy and safe holiday season!

Did you hit the stores today? We’d love to hear from you…

Photo Credit: Robert Banh